Seminar Guide

Colloquium (Thursdays at 4:00in Ker 317)
Refreshments served at 3:30.
Homepage: http://pi.math.virginia.edu/colloq/

Algebra Seminar (Wednesdays and some Fridays at 3:30 in Ker 317)
Homepage: http://pi.math.virginia.edu/algebra/

Galois Seminar (Mondays at 3:30 in Clk 102)
This new, expository seminar is concerned with the inverse Galois problem.  We start by exploring the analogies between Galois theory and covering spaces in algebraic topology and algebraic geometry, eventually working toward understanding the regular inverse Galois problem over the complex numbers, as well as over p-adic fields.  Much of the seminar will roughly follow Szamuely's book, "Galois Groups and Fundamental Groups."

Differential Equations Seminar (Tuesdays at 3:30 in Ker 317)
Homepage: http://pi.math.virginia.edu/~zg7c/deds.htm
Differential Equations Seminar is a mix of lectures, mainly by graduate students and outside speakers, in the general area of nonlinear partial differential equations (PDEs). The topics range from the basic equations of fluid (Navier-Stokes, Euler) and wave/elastic (nonlinear wave, Schrödinger, nonlinear plate) dynamics to various systems of coupled PDEs, e.g., fluid-structure interaction models. 

Geometry Seminar (Tuesdays at 2:00 in Ker 326)
Homepage: http://pi.math.virginia.edu/geometry/
The Geometry Seminar talks usually focus on aspects of low-dimensional topology and geometry, including knot theory and categorification, Floer homology, 3- and 4-dimensional manifolds, and symplectic and contact topology. The lectures are often given by outside speakers, however UVa graduate students and faculty give talks as well.

Graduate Seminar (Fridays at 2:30 in Kerchof 317)
Homepage: http://pi.math.virginia.edu/gradsem
The Graduate Seminar provides a friendly atmosphere for grad students to give talks about current interests, research, or teaching. This seminar is for grad students only and encourages audience participation while keeping the intensity level below that of other seminars. . 

Mathematical Physics Seminar (Wednesdays and some Fridays at 2:00 in Ker 326)
Homepage: http://pi.math.virginia.edu/mathphys/
The Mathematical Physics Seminar features talks on a wide variety of topics such as, for instance, Schrödinger operators, the mathematics of quantum systems, statistical mechanics, the renormalization group and quantum field theory. Lectures typically are of research level and are given by local as well as outside speakers. Graduate students in mathematical physics are encouraged to give presentations at this seminar about their ongoing research. Everyone is welcome to attend.

Operator Theory and Operator Algebras Seminar (Tuesdays at 3:30 in Ker 326)
Homepage: www.people.virginia.edu/~des5e/sotoa/sotoa.html
The Seminar in Operator Theory and Operator Algebras in recent semesters has covered a wide variety of topics in functional analysis, including C*-algebras and von Neumann algebras, composition operators, Banach spaces, noncommutative convexity, and applications of complex function theory. Most lectures are research level, but we also feature expository talks.

Probability Seminar (Wednesdays at 3:30 in Ker 326)
Homepage: http://faculty.virginia.edu/Probability/
The Probability Seminar is the place to see talks on active research topics in probability theory, as well as informal discussions of basic notions of probability.  We typically have invited speakers every 2-3 weeks presenting a wide array of research in probability. Most other weeks are informal discussions led by local participants, often graduate students discussing recently studied topics. The seminar is open to all. Feel free to attend regularly or occasionally. [Please see the online schedule for upcoming talks. You can also let the organizers know if you would like to be on the mailing list.]

Topology Seminar (Thursdays at 2:00 in Ker 326)
Homepage: http://pi.math.virginia.edu/topology/
Topology Seminar talks are on recent developments in algebraic topology—including homotopy theory, ordinary and extraordinary homology and cohomology, cobordism theory, and K-theory—and related subjects like differential topology and homological algebra.